Welcome to the Museum. 

Old Capitol; State Historical Society of Iowa photo

The Old Capitol remains one of the most recognizable symbols of the state of Iowa.  In the many years since the cornerstone was laid, the building has served state legislatures, countless university uses, and has undergone multiple additions and renovations, even surviving a major fire in 2001. Now a National Historic Landmark, the Old Capitol Museum welcomes you to explore.

Learn more about our history

Calendar

Piano Sundays at the Old Capitol: Réne Lecuona and Studio

Sunday, February 5, 2023 1:30pm
Old Capitol Museum
Piano Sundays at the Old Capitol: ne Lecuona and Studio Piano Sundays returns for the 2022-23 season! The University of Iowa School of Music, in partnership with the Old Capitol Museum and West Music, is proud to host this annual tradition. Performances will be at the Old Capitol Museum Senate Chambers this year, performed on their historic, rebuilt Steinway grand piano “Rose.” This is an incredible opportunity for the community to see and hear the university’s talented piano students and...

The University of Iowa Pentacrest Museums (Old Capitol Museum & The UI Museum of Natural History) serve to strengthen the vital role of both Museums in the educational, research, and engagement missions of the University, enhancing the campus-wide focus on cultural and environmental diversity. 

UI Campus graphic illustration

UI Indigenous Land Acknowledgement

The University of Iowa is located on the homelands of the Ojibwe/Anishinaabe (Chippewa), Báxoǰe (Iowa), Kiikaapoi (Kickapoo), Omāēqnomenēwak (Menominee), Myaamiaki (Miami), Nutachi (Missouri), Umoⁿhoⁿ (Omaha), Wahzhazhe (Osage), Jiwere (Otoe), Odawaa (Ottawa), Póⁿka (Ponca), Bodéwadmi/Neshnabé (Potawatomi), Meskwaki/Nemahahaki/Sakiwaki (Sac and Fox), Dakota/Lakota/Nakoda, Sahnish/Nuxbaaga/Nuweta (Three Affiliated Tribes) and Ho-Chunk (Winnebago) Nations. The following tribal nations, Umoⁿhoⁿ (Omaha Tribe of Nebraska and Iowa), Póⁿka (Ponca Tribe of Nebraska), Meskwaki (Sac and Fox of the Mississippi in Iowa), and Ho-Chunk (Winnebago Tribe of Nebraska) Nations continue to thrive in the State of Iowa and we continue to acknowledge them. As an academic institution, it is our responsibility to acknowledge the sovereignty and the traditional territories of these tribal nations, and the treaties that were used to remove these tribal nations, and the histories of dispossession that have allowed for the growth of this institution since 1847. Consistent with the University's commitment to Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, understanding the historical and current experiences of Native peoples will help inform the work we do; collectively as a university to engage in building relationships through academic scholarship, collaborative partnerships, community service, enrollment and retention efforts acknowledging our past, our present and future Native Nations.